ONE DRAFT DOWN, ????? TO GO

 

It is good news (at least for me) that I have finished the first draft of my second book, Coming to Amerika. The first draft has been undergoing editorial review from the professor at Northern State University who translated many of the letters used in this immigrant story.

I have started on the second draft and am looking for people willing to read the chapters and give me feedback. I want this to be a compelling, nonfiction family saga and need readers’ reactions.

If you are willing to go on this second journey with me, please let me know and I will feed you chapters as I progress. To give you an idea of what it encompasses I am including here the introduction.

INTRODUCTION

We are, as John F. Kennedy once famously wrote, a nation of immigrants. Driven by famine, warfare, religious persecution, and political and economic oppression, we came to the United States attracted by the opportunity for a freer life and greater economic security. The story, of course, is more complex than this. There are those of us who were brutally brought here as slaves and found no freedom or opportunity. And, there were those already here who lost much in people, property and their ways of life as a result of contact with immigrants.

These are the sweeping generalizations of standard history books. Beneath them, however, lies what I call “history at the ground level”— the unique stories of the individuals who lived the events so briefly described in the books. Coming to Amerikais one such unique story. It follows the fortunes of members of the Lodholz family as they journey to and settle in the United States.

Having a B.A. and M.A. degree in the field, I have been passionate about history since a teenager in Beirut, Lebanon, where my father was a diplomat and we explored Sidon, Tyre, Baalbek and the great Crusader castle of Krak des Chevaliers. This passion has now been fueled by an extensive collection of family documents and photographs, spanning some 100 years from 1850 to 1950, which came into my and my brother’s possession upon the death of family members. This comprehensive archive is unique in its breadth and depth. A true story, it rivals fictionalized family sagas such as BuddenbrooksThe Thorn BirdsRoots and the novels of James Michener.

The family seemingly threw nothing out. Letters were saved to be savored on multiple readings. Even receipts for the sale of eggs and small drawings by children were placed safely away. In them I found a richness of detail about the lives of a wide variety of individuals I had never known, each with his or her own quirks and personalities. It made a century of American history come alive and I wanted to share this discovery of what it was like to live through those times.

In addition, as an historian, I am acutely aware that immigrants have often met with hostility, the Irish and Chinese being prime examples. We need to be reminded, with works such as Coming toAmerika, that it is the immigrants’ successes, failures, trials and tribulations which are the stuff of which this nation is made.

The book is divided into two parts, each focusing on one generation of the family. In Part One: The First Generation you will travel with fifty-two-year-old Anna Maria Lodholz and her two teenage children as they leave Ebhausen in what is today Germany, sail on the S.S. Fox through the storms of the Atlantic to walk right off the ship in New York City (no Ellis Island at the time) to join two older children, factory workers in Terryville, Connecticut. You will follow the family westward to be among the earliest settlers on the seemingly endless plains of Kansas. There with few comforts, they risk crop failures, prairie fires and grasshopper plagues for land of their own and independence. Their prairie life contrasts dramatically with the unsettled factory existence of the one family member who remains behind, working in the Colt pistol factory during the Civil War and facing possible conscription.

Later, in Part Two: The Second Generation, you are introduced to the family of daughter Anna Regina Lodholz, married to Henry Reb, blacksmith and farmer, and their many children who after Henry’s death help their mother keep and grow their farm into a prosperous enterprise. Along the way you will meet a security guard at the Chicago World’s Fair, a woman who mastered printing glass plate negatives in a horse trough; a husband who took his wife and young child to California in the vain hope of curing her of tuberculosis; and a farmer hit hard by the Great Depression, losing two farms and reduced to working as a handyman to try to make ends meet. All these and more are the real-life characters whose voices you will hear in this narrative.

In writing Coming to Amerika, I found myself submerged in their world.  I hope that you can take yourself back almost two centuries now and find pleasure in submerging yourself in their world too.

 

NOTE ON TRANSCRIPTION OF LETTERS AND DOUMENTS:

It is difficult to convey from our present perspective how important letters were to our ancestors. Often separated by many long miles of difficult to traverse terrain, relatives and friends found in letters an emotional attachment to loved ones as well as information about their health, joys and sorrows; hard times and bountiful harvests; the quick strike of death and the newborn child.

Translated for the first time for this book, the letters and documents in Part One: The First Generation were written in Old German. I have generally kept to the translators’ wording while formatting the material into more coherent paragraphs. Paper was valuable and postage cost money so the letters were often crammed with writing.

The letters and documents in Part Two: The Second Generation were written in English. In transcribing these, I have kept the spelling of the writers and provided the modern correction only when it is not obvious what the word signified. Keeping the original spelling allows the reader to catch the accent of the letter writer. The letters contain run-on sentences and paragraphs, often skipping abruptly to new topics, one indication that the letters were often written in several sessions. In this case I have divided sentences, inserted punctuation and created paragraphs in order to make the text easier to follow.

In both parts I have added contextual information about events mentioned and unfamiliar terms and items. This information is hardly meant to be exhaustive and leaves the reader to explore further if he or she is curious about it.

The letters are of course arranged chronologically, but they are not consecutive, that is, there was obviously more correspondence than was actually saved. The sequence of letters, however, provide a consistent story of interwoven lives. Coming to Amerika reads I hope like a good epistolary novel.

 

 

Examined Lives is Live

My memoir Examined Lives is finally out there!  It is currently available in hardbound, softbound and Kindle versions with the e-book and audiobook a few weeks down the road.  It is available at Amazon and Barnes and Noble.  Please check it out and spread the word!  I would appreciate your contacting me if you are willing to do a review.  I can send a digital copy of the manuscript now and give you a free book when I receive my copies.  Reviews are so important and friends are the best source!

Information about the book launch coming up shortly!

 

https://www.barnesandnoble.com/w/books/1129158355?ean=9781480863200

Welcome to the Camellia House!

In my last blog I talked about The Drake Hotel where my mother worked as a hostess at the Camellia House, for her “a dream come true.”  She seated the likes of Clark Gable, Greta Carbo, Harold Lloyd and Joan Blondell.

Now welcome to the Camellia House, where I will be holding the book launch for Examined Lives on October 10th, World Mental Health Day, between 7 and 8:30. Fittingly enough there will be champagne and various savories and desserts.  Dress as you like, but this is your chance to dress to the 9’s if you so choose.

Please feel free to share this with family, significant others and friends.  For more information and to be placed on my contact list, they can use the contact form below or go to my blog at www.examininglives.com.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

The Drake Hotel

 

The Drake Hotel, named after John B. Drake and Tracey Corey Drake, the two brothers who built it on property purchased from Potter Palmer, opened its door on New Year’s Eve, 1920 to a party of some 2,000 of Chicago’s most distinguished citizens.  Standing at Lake Shore Drive and the north end of the Magnificent Mile, it formed a transition from the exclusive Gold Coast neighborhood and the nascent commercial district that eventually grew up around it and for which it set the tone.  It was one of the hotel bookends owned by the Drake brothers, the other being the Blackstone Hotel at the south end of the Magnificent Mile.

From the beginning it was the haunt of the powerful and famous.  A list of visitors would be a who’s who of the 20thcentury, including movie stars and heads of state.  Famously, the newlyweds Marilyn Monroe and Joe DiMaggio carved their initials, still preserved, on the bar of the Cape Cod Room.

It was and still is known for its Afternoon Teas in the elegant Palm Court (see pix above) and has its own special blend of tea for the occasion.

The Camellia House, where my mother served as hostess, seating the likes of Clark Gable and Greta Garbo, opened around 1940.  It is a relatively small room with an even smaller private dining room to one side, and a small stage where the likes of Frank Sinatra sang.  It has floor to ceiling mirrored pillars and large, crystal chandeliers.  It was designed by the famous Dorothy Draper, who managed to develop a thriving business after her husband ran off with another women the week of the Wall Street Crash.  Her specialty, which other interior designers had shied away from, was turning the public spaces of resort hotels from bland areas to walk through to luxurious surroundings to linger in.  Her dictum, reflecting her confidence was, “If it looks right, it is right.”

The entrance to the Camellia House up two short staircases directly opposite the front door.  There is a balcony area, now closed off, behind a clock where the paparazzi would congregate to take pictures of the celebrities making their way to dinner.

There is now Camellia Room where tea is served at Christmas, but that is not the real Camellia House.  That room, however, still exists, now called The Drake Room but alas they no longer serve dinner there!